Science

The Science Curriculum aims to engage students to experience the full wonder of the world around them and the wider universe. Students are challenged and encouraged to develop curiosity in scientific ideas and concepts in order to establish a firm foundation in key scientific ideas and theories.

Students have the opportunity to participate in various practical activities and engaging trips that aim to enhance their understanding of the subject.

At Key Stage 3, Year 7 students take part in a two week ‘Science Induction’ Programme. The programme aims to prepare students for the Key Stage 3 curriculum and raises their confidence in carrying out practical activities. The following areas are covered:

  • Lab Safety
  • How to use a Bunsen burner and other lab equipment
  • Hazards and Risk Assessments
  • Mathematical Skills in Science

The Key Stage 3 curriculum is split up into two years, Year 7 and Year 8. Many aspects of the Key Stage 3 curriculum are closely related to the GCSE curriculum. Students are assessed at the end of each topic and in an end of year exam.

The subjects studied in each year are as follows.

Year 7 – Cells, Structure and Function of Body Systems, Reproduction, Particles and their Behaviour, Elements, Atoms and Compounds, Reactions, Acids and Alkalis, Forces, Sound, Light and Space.

Year 8 – Health and lifestyle, Ecosystem Processes, Adaptation and Inheritance, Periodic Table, Separation Techniques, Metals and Acids, The Earth, Electricity and Magnetism, Energy, Motion and Pressure

At Key Stage 4, most students study the AQA GCSE Double Science Award. Students are given the opportunity to begin study in Year 9 building on the strong Key Stage 3 foundation taught in years 7 and 8.  This Double Award Science trilogy course is split up into three units: Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Each of these units consists of individual topics. Students’ progress is assessed termly by end of topic tests and mock exams.

This qualification is linear, meaning that all the examinations are taken at the end of the course. There are six papers: two biology, two chemistry and two physics. Each of the papers will assess knowledge and understanding from distinct topic areas. Each exam is 75 minutes long.

The topics covered are as follows.

Biology – Cell Biology, Organisation, Infection and Response, Bioenergetics, Homeostasis and Response, Inheritance, Variation and Evolution, Ecology.

Chemistry – Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table, Bonding, Structure and the Properties of Matter, Quantitative Chemistry, Chemical Changes, Energy Changes, the Rate and Extent of Chemical Change, Organic Chemistry, Chemical Analysis, Chemistry of the Atmosphere, Using Resources.

Physics – Energy, Electricity, Particle Model of Matter, Atomic Structure, Forces, Waves, Magnetism, Electromagnetism.

Some students may study Physics, Chemistry and Biology as individual subjects leading to three separate GCSE awards in Science. Typically these will be the students who achieve best at Key Stage 3.

The topics covered are similar to the double award but are studied in more detail.

There are six exam papers: two biology, two chemistry and two physics. Each of the papers will assess knowledge and understanding from distinct topic areas. Each exam is 105 minutes long. All three of these qualifications are linear.

The topics covered are as follows.

Biology – Cell Biology, Organisation, Infection and Response, Bioenergetics, Homeostasis and Response, Inheritance, Variation and Evolution, Ecology.

Chemistry – Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table, Bonding, Structure and the Properties of Matter, Quantitative Chemistry, Chemical Changes, Energy Changes, the Rate and Extent of Chemical Change, Organic Chemistry, Chemical Analysis, Chemistry of the Atmosphere, Using Resources.

Physics –   Energy, Electricity, Particle Model of Matter, Atomic Structure, Forces, Waves, Magnetism, Electromagnetism, Space Physics.